Royal Dutch Shell: The World’s Dirtiest Oil Company

Royal Dutch Shell: The World's Dirtiest Oil Company

Part 1 of 3: Ties to the American Legislative Exchange Council

“[Royal Dutch Shell PLC a.k.a. Shell Oil Company a.k.a.] Shell is a corporate member of the American Legislative Exchange Council (ALEC) as of 2011.  G. Edward Pickle, Senior Government Affairs Counsel of Shell Oil Company, is Shell’s representative to ALEC’s Civil Justice Task Force.  It was a ‘Chairman’ level sponsor of the 2011 American Legislative Exchange Council Annual Conference, which in 2010, equated to $50,000.  Shell also sponsored the Plenary Session speeches on August 4th, 2011, by ALEC ‘scholars’ Arthur B. Laffer and Stephen Moore…  ALEC is not a lobby; it is not a front group.  It is much more powerful than that.  Through ALEC, behind closed doors, corporations hand state legislators the changes to the law they desire that directly benefit their bottom line.  Along with legislators, corporations have membership in ALEC.  Corporations sit on all nine ALEC task forces and vote with legislators to approve ‘model’ bills.  They have their own corporate governing  board which meets jointly with the legislative board.  (ALEC says that corporations do not vote on the board.)  They fund almost all of ALEC’s operations.  Participating legislators, overwhelmingly conservative Republicans, then bring those proposals home and introduce them in statehouses across the land as their own brilliant ideas and important public policy innovation – without disclosing that corporations crafted and voted on the bills.  ALEC boasts that it has over 1,000 of these bills introduced by legislative members every year, with one in every five of them enacted into law.  ALEC describes itself as a ‘unique,’ ‘unparalleled’ and ‘unmatched’ organization.  It might be right.  It is as if a state legislature had been reconstituted, yet corporations had pushed the people out the door.  Learn more at http://ALECexposed.org

http://www.sourcewatch.org/index.php?title=Shell_Oil_Company

Part 2 of 3: The Oil Spill the World Forgot

“As the oil spill in the Gulf of Mexico continues to dominate headlines around the world, public outrage is being focused more intensely upon BP and its gaffe-prone CEO Tony Hayward. But amidst this crisis, the public should not forget the atrocities committed by other massive oil companies. For example, Royal Dutch Shell’s drilling operations have been spilling oil into the Niger Delta in Nigeria since 1958. Because Nigeria is an impoverished nation and oil revenues fund a majority of government operations, Shell and other companies have been able to drill and pollute without serious oversight for all these years. It is estimated that 13 million barrels of oil have spilled into the delta, making life even more difficult for the region’s destitute residents. Shell blames the constant spills on attacks from “rebels,” who are in fact minority ethnic groups who feel they have been exploited and displaced by foreign oil companies. But Shell would never consider pulling out of the region or finding ways to avoid ethnic strife. Instead, Shell has proceeded with business as usual, and spilled a record 14,000 tons of crude oil into the delta last year [2009].”

http://www.prwatch.org/news/2010/06/9164/oil-spill-world-forgot

Part 3 of 3: Shell’s Big Dirty Secret: Insight into the world’s most carbon intensive oil company

“This new research paper rates the carbon intensity of the top international oil companies, revealing that Shell is now the most carbon intensive oil company in the world based on its total resources.  This report documents Shell’s record investment in dirty forms of energy, and it illuminates the corporate strategy and lobbying for regulations that indicate it intends to profit from that position for a long time to come.  Our key conclusions are:

* Shell holds more carbon in its resources, per barrel of future oil equivalent, than any other major international oil company. Shell is therefore the world’s most carbon intensive oil company;

* The average carbon intensity of each barrel of oil and gas Shell produces is set to rise dramatically, increasing 85 per cent on today’s figure;

* This sharp increase is caused by Shell’s move into oil sands, its reliance on liquefied natural gas (LNG) and its continued gas flaring in Nigeria;

* Shell continues to expand investments in oil sands and oil shale, relying on the dirtiest technologies to establish itself as a leader in the industry;

* Shell has stopped its investments in renewables, except for biofuels, which pose a whole new set of environmental problems;

* Internal documents obtained in the discovery process of Wiwa v. Shell reveal that although Shell could have ended gas flaring in the early ’90′s, it decided it was more profitable not to;

* Shell continues to flare gas in Nigeria at levels which, according to its own figures, are only 12% less than those of 1999 after accounting for the reductions due to community unrest;

* Because of all of the above, Shell is more vulnerable to carbon pricing and subject to greater carbon risk than its peers.

* Therefore, Shell is leading industry lobby efforts in Washington, Brussels, and the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change to weaken and neuter legislation and regulation to tackle climate change.”

http://priceofoil.org/educate/resources/shells-big-dirty-secret/

Related Image:

http://ldrlongdistancerider.com/images/Royal_Dutch_Shell_Global_Polluters.jpg

Related Video:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2in7L0VFsrM

 

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